Leadership Education

PHL118L: A Reflection

I’m not going to lie- having an 8am class sounded horrible, and I was not the biggest fan of philosophy. You could probably imagine my enthusiasm and I entered the class on the first day.

Despite it being an 8am, I was thankful to have a class with my LAS cohort. Not knowing what to expect, I was sort of interested in what was to come in this philosophy class. I was curious as to what sort of information we would be tested on and what we would take away from this class.

The professor, Gary Fuller, is one of the most interesting people I have ever met. And I mean that in every positive way possible. He is extremely enthusiastic about every topic he talks about, and he knows every little detail about everything- and I mean everything. Gary is an extremely intelligent man, and he has a way of explaining things that makes them interesting to learn about. You can tell that he is passionate about what he teaches, and it is clearly shown in his lectures. His little comments and jokes cracked me up throughout the semester, and he made the class interactive.

There were assigned chapters in the books that we are instructed to read, and short quizzes followed the assigned chapters. Many different topics that had to do with morality were introduced, such as assisted suicide, euthanasia, hooking up, animal rights, and abortion. Each topic was explained in detail and was followed by a few examples to help us understand the concept.

We all were placed in groups to create a presentation, and I spoke about the Terri Schiavo case that involved the discussion of involuntary vs. voluntary euthanasia. This was an interesting thing to present on, and we had to give our own opinions on what we thought was morally permissible.

Overall, I learned a lot in this class. I was able to really analyze the concepts that were taught and I could really dig deeper into what my opinions were on them. The class provided a very informative way of looking at different moral questions, and Gary made the class a fun one to go to.

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Leadership Education

LDR200L Reflection

As a requirement for the LAS scholarship, everyone in the cohort is required to take LDR200L. This course met on Wednesday afternoons from 4-7. This course taught us about different leadership theories, how to create a useful powerpoint presentation, and how to facilitate a workshop.

Some of the assignments required for the class included writing a paper about our own personal leadership philosophy. I loved this assignment because I was able to explain my own philosophy and tell why I do the things I do. Another assignment was leading a Leadership Initiative. We were put into groups of three and had to lead a learning activity that taught a concept of leadership to one half of the class. The Leadership Workshop was my favorite task. While working in a group, a few members of my cohort and I were required to facilitate a workshop that explained a leadership theory. The workshop had to include an activity and a powerpoint and it lasted around a half hour long. This was my favorite task because I learn best with hands-on-activities, and it made it easier to memorize the different leadership theories.

My favorite part of this class was gaining experience and knowledge on how to facilitate activities and workshops. I was able to interact with my fellow LAS members while getting help from the awesome TA’s. Now that I have participated in LDR200L, I am ready to sign my minor in Leadership and experience new courses in the future. I learned how to give a presentation that got straight to the point while being organized and clean. Because of this class, I feel more confident in public speaking and talking in front of a large group of people. I became a better listener and learned how to properly communicate with someone else and give feedback that helps them. I can’t wait to pursue my minor of Leadership and I am ready for the next LDR class!

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Leadership Education

Why?

In a previous blog post, I described the project I had to do on the novel, Start With Why by Simon Sinek. Start With Why describes the “Why? How? What?” Golden Circle model, referring to the three questions we often ask ourselves when doing things.

The what refers to what we do. It’s as simple as that.

The how refers to how we do what we do. Sinek refers to this aspect as the “differentiating value.”

The why is the trickiest question in the model. It asks us why we do the things we do. Why we get out of bed in the morning, and why we do the things we normally do in our daily lives.

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So What? As an assignment for LDR200L, we were told to develop a ‘why’ statement that applies to us. We watched the Golden Circle Ted Talk and had a discussion on why it is so important to develop our own ‘why’ statements. It made me reflect on my daily activities, and really got me thinking about why I actually do what I do. I get out of bed in the morning to spread kindness and positivity, to help people, and to make that day the best day I’ve had thus far. It’s my mindset, and it is what I love focusing on. After thinking for a few days, writing down little things that I wanted to be a part of my ‘why’ statement, and crossing out many different sentences- I came up with my ‘why’.

Why do I live my daily life the way I do? What is my purpose? To inspire others to promote positivity and live fearlessly.

Now What? Thinking of this statement took me a while, and I couldn’t be happier with it. It is a daily reminder to get out of bed and live my life to its fullest potential-no matter what that day has in store for me. Being positive is fun- there is no reason to add unnecessary negativity into anyone’s life. Thinking about my purpose inspires me to do everything to my maximum ability, and to inspire others to do the same!

Check out the Ted Talk Golden Circle Model below, and develop your own ‘why’ statement!

Leadership Development

Yes or No?

Does leadership come from a “yes” or a “no”? 

When I first read this question, I had to take a step back and reflect on what I was really being asked. After analyzing the question, I came up with what it meant to me: “Do leaders say “yes” or “no”? My first thought: it’s “no”. Why would you say yes to everything? Wouldn’t that just get you in trouble? What if something bad happens? What if the task is too hard or too much to handle? My second thought: it’s “yes”. It’s 100%, absolutely, most definitely “yes”. 

Saying “yes” opens doors, creates new opportunities, and encourages growth. Being a leader means trying new things, growing, and helping others. It also means listening, learning, overcoming barriers, and being the bigger person.

“Do you want to go volunteer?” “Yes.”

“Do you want to join a new club?” “Yep.”

“Do you want to go skydiving?” “Definitely.”

Saying “no” means you’re turning down new experiences, new friends, new lessons, and new stories. I believing in living life to its maximum potential, and making every day better than the one before it. Living life to its fullest means striving to be the best version of you, making every day count, being completely open to trying new things, and pushing yourself to get better at what you do.

Now What? Start saying yes- I promise you won’t regret it. Ordinary people do extraordinary things, and saying yes is just the beginning. New opportunities and experiences come from saying yes, and learning comes from stepping outside of your comfort zone- another thing to say yes to.

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Leadership Development, Leadership Education

Start With Why

“Leadership requires two things: a vision of the world that does not yet exist and the ability to communicate it.” – Simon Sinek

In LDR 100, we were required to complete a book project for the end of the year. The project was to create a 20 minute presentation about a novel we were assigned in class. Each book had to do with leadership, and we were put into groups to work with.

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I was assigned the novel Start With Why by Simon Sinek. Start With Why is a book about a way of communicating that gives leaders the ability to inspire those around them. This novel was made into a well-known Ted Talk and has gotten over twenty nine million views since it was released. I attached a shortened version of the video below!

First, we started our presentation off with the “Why?” aspect of the book. We asked the class who their role models were, and told them to think about why this person inspires them. We then moved on to the “Golden Circle”, which includes three major parts. These parts are, “Why?” (what your purpose/beliefs are), “How?” (how something is different or better), and “What?” (what you do). We then moved on to the major themes of the book. The themes we mentioned were as follows: Inspiration, Passion, and Personal Leadership. We focused the Inspiration theme on the fact that the people we see as leaders are usually the ones who have inspired us. We then spoke about how we tend to find our “Why?” from the things we are passionate about. Lastly, we infused leadership with our own experiences and spoke about how  you have to be inspired in order to inspire others.

Now What? Simon Sinek taught me to find my own “Why?” statement and take a step back to really dig deep into things and topics that I usually wouldn’t think twice about. I can now rationalize my thinking, and am now able to explain why I feel the way I feel about a certain topic. This project was a fun one to create, and was even more fun to present!

Check out the video I made for our presentation below!