Leadership Training, Service

Pre-Service Trip: LAS in the D

detroit

On Friday, February 10th, I will be traveling to Detroit with my LAS 2016 cohort and some amazing faculty members to partake in a service trip. We will be going to the Jalen Rose Leadership Academy to lead initiatives and activities, and we will be volunteering at different locations that we are assigned to.

Living near Detroit, I am able to visit there pretty often. Whether it’s rocking out at concerts, going to baseball games, visiting little coffee shops, or just looking around the city- I notice how different it actually is from the stereotypes it receives. I am aware that there are many social issues in Detroit- some of the issues including the lack of funding for public schools, poverty, and crime. We hear about these things all the time on the news, but we never think twice about them. Most of the time, we hear only about the bad things that happen in the city- never the good things. Detroit is so much more than it appears to be, and I can’t wait to serve in the city.

The purpose of Central Michigan University is to prepare Michigan’s students and citizens for leadership roles in a challenging and complex society. This experience will help familiarize me with roles of being a leader as I perform tasks and lead initiatives with my group. Being assigned to run through activities will help me gain experience that I can use in the future. 

The vision of the Leadership Institute is to prepare the next generation of individuals who will act responsibly to improve the quality of life, improve the state of the economy, and improve the communities in which they live and work. This trip will work to inspire us and challenge us to open our eyes to the bigger issues that surround us. It will make us realize that we have the potential to change not only the community we live in, but the world, and I am so excited to do just that.

Going on this trip will help me grow as both a leader and an individual. I am ecstatic to be able to improve my leadership skills by running activities and leading things on my own. I have never led a workshop or facilitated group activities before, so I am ready to take on a new challenge and get out of my comfort zone. I am so excited to be able to volunteer while helping people in need. I am also ready to make new connections with people I don’t know that well and form new memories that I’ll always have to take with me. I love helping out the community and I am ready to be exposed to issues that our society faces today and further my knowledge on Detroit. Fire up for LAS in the D!

Advertisements
Leadership Development, Leadership Education, Leadership Training

Igniting the Spark

As a requirement for our LAS Scholarship, our 2016 cohort needed to attend the Spark Leadership conference. Not knowing what exactly this conference would entail, I was pretty excited for it.

I walked into the ballroom in the LI, picked up my name tag, and sat at a table with a few people from my LAS cohort and a few others that I hadn’t met before. Also sitting at the table was a staff member of Spark, otherwise known as a team leader. After being called up and introduced to all of the people participating in Spark, the team leaders switched tables, and my table got the pleasure of working with Connor Haskins.

The first activity on the agenda was finding out our own personal leadership styles- something I was very interested in. The four different types of leaders were Systematic, Spirited, Considerate, and Direct. After ranking a series of activities from 1 to 5, I found out that I was a Spirited leader.

After learning about what type of leader we all were, we broke into different groups pertaining to our own leadership styles. I went into the Spirited group, and we all discussed why we were categorized into Spirited leaders and what characteristics we all exemplified. Some of these characteristics were that we were all super positive, very outgoing, we encouraged others, and we like to be outside of our comfort zones. After going back to our tables, we chose what leadership style we wanted to improve on. I chose Systematic, because I’d like to be more organized and want to step back and think about things more before going ahead and doing them.

spark-pic
Photo by the Leadership Institute

Later, we were separated into different classrooms and were put into two groups: Alphas and Betas. I was an Alpha, and we were required to participate in a game. The rules of the Alpha culture were that we had to embrace in a hug or pat someone on the back before speaking to someone, we had to ask about the men in that person’s life, and we were then able to participate in a card game. The Betas would come over to our Alpha classroom to observe our behavior, and we would always kick them out.

After debriefing our activity, we learned that everyone gets treated differently and sometimes you have to take a step back and realize that we aren’t all the same. You could be saying or doing something offensive without even noticing, and we need to realize that everyone is different.

Now What? I got a lot out of Spark, and-despite having strep throat and wanting to be curled up in bed- I really enjoyed the conference. I learned that I am a Spirited leader, and I now know how to help out when it comes to leadership activities and now know what to contribute. I am excited to take the steps towards becoming a more Systematic leader by organizing all of my things into folders, color coding my notes that I take in class, thinking about and analyzing my actions before taking them, and participating in many more leadership conferences.

spark-pics2

Leadership Education

COM 267L Reflection

debateFor our LAS scholarship, we are required to take COM 267L (Introduction to Debate). Taking a debate class sounded absolutely terrifying to me, as I hated public speaking, but it wasn’t as bad as I had expected it to be.

Our 2016 cohort was split into two classes: Tuesdays and Thursdays at 9:30 and at 12:30. I was placed in the 9:30 class. In our class, we were put into debate “groups”and were required to argue with/against those students for the semester. In my group, I had the pleasure of working with Lucas Gustafson, Mary Miller, Jacob Sova, and Megan Bird. Professor Cory Hillman (otherwise known as Dr. Professor Cory Anthony Hillman) presented information about Aristotle and gave us information that included learning about ethos, pathos, logos, and other topics. We then had a few practice debates and two formal, graded debates. My groups first argument (the Parliamentary Debate) was, “Should Performance Enhancing Drugs/Drug Enhancers Be Used in Professional Sports?” I was placed on the side that had to argue that performance enhancing drugs should be used in professional sports, and it was really hard because it wasn’t something I was passionate about. Our second debate (the Lincoln-Douglas Debate) was, “Should All Schools Be Year Round?” I had to argue that all schools should not be year round, and it was a tad bit easier for me because that I what I truly believe.

Now What? Although I had some nights where I would sit on my laptop and stress about whether or not my debate was going to go well the next morning, I did like the class. This course taught me that public speaking isn’t so bad- especially when you’re passionate about the topic you’re speaking about. I am excited to use the public speaking skills that I learned in other classes when giving presentations over the course of my college career. I can also apply skills like note-taking and heavy listening to my future courses.

Community, Leadership Development, Leadership Training

Mentor/Mentee Retreat

On September 10th, 2016, I hopped on a bus with my LAS cohort and the sophomore cohort above us. We headed over to Eagle Village in Hersey, Michigan for the weekend. After hanging out for a little bit, we presented the “Road Map” life timeline project that we were required to create before retreat. Later on, we were required to do a list of team building activities. We were assigned a certain group, and we stuck with that group for the weekend. After a long day of stressful events, we all gathered around a campfire to make s’mores and give “shoutouts” to our friends and mentors. This was my favorite part of the night, because it really showed how genuine these people are. Everyone was opening up and showing their true feelings, and it was amazing to see everyone’s different personalities.

The next morning, we had some free times to climb rock walls and hang out. It was my first time climbing a rock wall, so I was as nervous as ever. It also didn’t help that I was afraid of heights! As I was climbing the wall, I was about to give up because I thought I couldn’t climb any higher. The mentors and mentees on the ground below me kept urging me to go higher and were cheering me on, so I got a burst of adrenaline and kept climbing. I felt so awesome once I reached my goal, and I was so happy that I was able to get over my fear of heights (for a little bit, at least). After rock climbing, we went back to our team building activities. These activities were stressful and required teamwork and concentration. For one of the activities, the requirement was to take two PVC pipes and a golf ball and get the ball to the other side of the room without it falling onto the ground. This activity took our group two hours to complete. Yeah, you read that right- TWO HOURS. Everyone was getting extremely frustrated that the ball kept falling onto the ground, so our group leader offered us the option to give up and move on to the next activity. My group wasn’t ready to accept failure, and we continued the activity for a while longer. Finally, after several (and I do mean several) tries, we got the ball to the other side of the room. My entire group started screaming and running around, and we all were ecstatic that we kept trying and finally achieved our goal.

retreattt

After the team building events, we moved on to the High Ropes course. As I mentioned before, I really hate heights. I was nervous to participate in the course, but I decided to do it because I wanted to gain a new experience and I was hoping to learn something new out of it. After saddling up and putting our helmets on, I climbed up the ladder with my mentor, Faith, and my LAS “brother”, Markus. The very first course I did involved crawling across a rope, and I instantly fell off and had to work my way back to the platform. Every time I fell off, someone would cheer me on and tell me that I could make it to the end of the course. Each course required various skills and determination, and it was extremely tiring. Not to mention, the course was around 50 feet off the ground. Once again, heights- not my thing.  Though I fell off multiple times, I was pleasantly surprised by the outcome of the ropes course. I learned new skills and got to step out of my comfort zone and try something new.

Now What? Retreat was something I’ll always remember, and I loved getting to bond with new friends from my cohort that I didn’t get to talk to very often. The event taught me many skills, and really showed me what leadership is about. I can’t wait to make even more connections with people within my cohort and experience many new things with them. I am excited to develop new skills and show everyone the leader I can be. I am so thankful that I was able to connect with genuine, kindhearted people, and learn new skills that I can use for the rest of my life.

Check out this awesome Retreat video for a recap of our weekend!

Leadership Training

Leadership Safari

Moving away from home was the hardest thing I have ever had to experience. Summer was over, and it was time to start the next chapter of my life in a completely new place with completely new people. As I headed up to Central, I kept trying to convince myself that the upcoming week would be amazing.

And it was.

Leadership Safari is a 5 day program with events that help students learn about leadership skills, while creating bonds within the group. Some of the events included community service, team building and problem solving activities, a comedy show, and a slam poetry show. The schedule had things planned from early morning until late at night, which made each day fly by. Having things to do all day really helped keep me busy, and it distracted me from the homesick feelings that overwhelmed me.

Each group in Safari had a team animal name, and I was put on team Blue Jay. Right off the bat, I knew this group was perfect for me. Of course, the first hour was a little awkward- we were put in a group with 15 other strangers that we’ve never met before and were basically forced to bond with them. I had no problem with that though, as I wanted to make friends in my new “hometown” of Mount Pleasant. The Blue Jays were always cracking jokes, yelling, laughing, and taking pictures. The group really helped me adjust to Central, and I still talk to the friends in my group today, even though Safari was a month ago.

Leadership Safari was such an amazing experience, and I’m so happy that I was able to go through it. The program really helped me take a step outside of my comfort zone, and I learned so many skills and really enjoyed the entire week. I made new friends, came out of my shell, and discovered that being yourself is the best thing you can do!

Now What? I am going to reach out to people to make new friends, join in on new RSO’s, and try to make the most out of my college experience. Safari showed me all of the different opportunities and programs that CMU has to offer, and I can’t wait to start this new chapter of my life by getting involved and having the time of my life.

Check out the Leadership Safari 2016 video!