Service

Servant Leadership

In LDR200L, we focused our learning on many types of leadership. My favorite theory to learn about was servant leadership. Servant leadership is the theory of bettering the lives of other people by serving them, and making sure you’re always putting yourself first before everyone else. The description of the theory (provided by the servant leadership workshop) is a “philosophy where a leader with strong values places others above their own self-interests and emphasizes the growth of their followers.” As a part of the LAS protocol, we are required to serve 30 hours of volunteer service per year. Volunteering is a very important part of LAS, and these hours can be served in many different ways.

I found myself experiencing the servant leadership theory during the LAS in the D service trip and during Relay For Life. On the trip, we traveled to Detroit for the weekend to help out the community and learn more about Detroit. On the last day of the trip, my cohort and I visited Cass Community Social Services to serve the community. We were split into groups, and I went to the green warehouse to sort cardboard and shred papers. I was so excited to work with people in my cohort to clean up the warehouse and help out the members of the community by taking some of the work off of their hands.

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Servant leadership was also portrayed during  Relay For Life when my LEAD team was required to stay at the Leadership Institute table and explain what we were selling. We volunteered for several hours and had so much fun doing it. I also participated in the Mary Ellen Brandell Volunteer Center during the semester. I helped out with the Safer Sex Patrol by promoting safe sex with a group of other volunteers at the local bars, and I made paracord bracelets for the soldiers overseas. These bracelets are worn by soldiers and can be used when they are in emergency situations.

Now that I have experienced servant leadership firsthand, I realize that it is my favorite leadership theory, while also being the most important leadership theory. I have learned that it is so essential to put others before yourself and help out others in any way possible. I am making it a goal to make sure that I put everyone before myself and serve the community, while also being selfless. I want to encourage others to promote self growth by putting people before themselves and leading in the best way they can.

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Community, Uncategorized

RSO

An RSO is a Registered Student Organization on CMU’s campus. These organizations are clubs with scheduled meetings, and there are many options to choose from. I joined FAMD (Fashion Association of Merchandising and Design) first semester. This RSO focuses on fashion and the fashion industry. At the meetings, speakers from different parts of the fashion world come in and speak. Some of the speakers included managers from many different stores including Buckle and Kohls. Personally, my favorite speaker was Kathryn Konarska from Kathryn Ann Bridal. Kathryn came in with her husband and explained her entire journey as an intern in the fashion industry. She moved multiple times and was interning in New York City before deciding to move back to Michigan. She later created her own brand of wedding dresses and veils and has boutiques all across Michigan.

FAMD also dedicates a lot of time focusing on the campus-wide fashion show, Threads. Threads is a student-run fashion show held on April 22, 2017. Different designers get to show off their work and gain experience in designing, marketing, and fashion production. Threads is a big deal for people majoring in Fashion Merchandising and Design, and many of CMU’s students are able to model the clothing designed for the fashion show. Each year, Threads is focused on a different theme. Students dedicate so much time into the fashion show, and they are able to learn all about proper walks, stage lighting, makeup, and more.

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Allie and I at the FAMD banquet

 

Another RSO I was involved with was Barnes and Robinson Hall Council. Meetings were every Monday, and we discussed upcoming events in the Barnes and Robinson community. Each week had a different theme, and if you dressed like the theme, you would earn points for your floor. Each week, I would learn about new activities that were going on that I could attend. Members could also have a say in any problems or issues that would go on in the halls, and I liked being able to meet different people from the Robinson community or people on the floors I didn’t live on. Hall Council helped inform me and make me aware of events happening and allowed me to learn more about the North Campus community.

Leadership Training, Service

Pre-Service Trip: LAS in the D

detroit

On Friday, February 10th, I will be traveling to Detroit with my LAS 2016 cohort and some amazing faculty members to partake in a service trip. We will be going to the Jalen Rose Leadership Academy to lead initiatives and activities, and we will be volunteering at different locations that we are assigned to.

Living near Detroit, I am able to visit there pretty often. Whether it’s rocking out at concerts, going to baseball games, visiting little coffee shops, or just looking around the city- I notice how different it actually is from the stereotypes it receives. I am aware that there are many social issues in Detroit- some of the issues including the lack of funding for public schools, poverty, and crime. We hear about these things all the time on the news, but we never think twice about them. Most of the time, we hear only about the bad things that happen in the city- never the good things. Detroit is so much more than it appears to be, and I can’t wait to serve in the city.

The purpose of Central Michigan University is to prepare Michigan’s students and citizens for leadership roles in a challenging and complex society. This experience will help familiarize me with roles of being a leader as I perform tasks and lead initiatives with my group. Being assigned to run through activities will help me gain experience that I can use in the future. 

The vision of the Leadership Institute is to prepare the next generation of individuals who will act responsibly to improve the quality of life, improve the state of the economy, and improve the communities in which they live and work. This trip will work to inspire us and challenge us to open our eyes to the bigger issues that surround us. It will make us realize that we have the potential to change not only the community we live in, but the world, and I am so excited to do just that.

Going on this trip will help me grow as both a leader and an individual. I am ecstatic to be able to improve my leadership skills by running activities and leading things on my own. I have never led a workshop or facilitated group activities before, so I am ready to take on a new challenge and get out of my comfort zone. I am so excited to be able to volunteer while helping people in need. I am also ready to make new connections with people I don’t know that well and form new memories that I’ll always have to take with me. I love helping out the community and I am ready to be exposed to issues that our society faces today and further my knowledge on Detroit. Fire up for LAS in the D!

Leadership Development

Yes or No?

Does leadership come from a “yes” or a “no”? 

When I first read this question, I had to take a step back and reflect on what I was really being asked. After analyzing the question, I came up with what it meant to me: “Do leaders say “yes” or “no”? My first thought: it’s “no”. Why would you say yes to everything? Wouldn’t that just get you in trouble? What if something bad happens? What if the task is too hard or too much to handle? My second thought: it’s “yes”. It’s 100%, absolutely, most definitely “yes”. 

Saying “yes” opens doors, creates new opportunities, and encourages growth. Being a leader means trying new things, growing, and helping others. It also means listening, learning, overcoming barriers, and being the bigger person.

“Do you want to go volunteer?” “Yes.”

“Do you want to join a new club?” “Yep.”

“Do you want to go skydiving?” “Definitely.”

Saying “no” means you’re turning down new experiences, new friends, new lessons, and new stories. I believing in living life to its maximum potential, and making every day better than the one before it. Living life to its fullest means striving to be the best version of you, making every day count, being completely open to trying new things, and pushing yourself to get better at what you do.

Now What? Start saying yes- I promise you won’t regret it. Ordinary people do extraordinary things, and saying yes is just the beginning. New opportunities and experiences come from saying yes, and learning comes from stepping outside of your comfort zone- another thing to say yes to.

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Leadership Development

Current Leader Reflection

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When you hear the name “Ellen DeGeneres”, what do you think of? Do you think of her spunky blonde hair and her contagious laughter? Or her dance moves and her famous “Scaring Celebrities” skits? Whatever comes to mind is most likely 100% positive, and that is because Ellen is an excellent role model. A “role mode” is defined as a person whose behavior can be imitated by others, especially by younger people (according to Dictionary.com). People of all ages look up to Ellen, and here are just a few reasons why she is an impeccable leader.

  • She is always positive. Ellen’s positivity radiates into the crowd and her infamous dance moves are a key  of the show. She is always smiling and telling stories that promote positivity and inspire others. Heck, most of the time she even shows funny videos to get the crowd laughing!
  • She isn’t afraid to express how she feels. Though she usually voices her opinions in a joking matter, Ellen likes to express how she feels to her guests and to the people attending the show. Being a leader means not being afraid to speak up and say what you’re feeling, and Ellen accomplishes this.
  • She isn’t afraid to be herself. Ellen is always making jokes and clearly shows that she doesn’t care what people think of her (in a good way, of course!) She does her own thing, and everyone loves that about her.
  • She is headstrong and hardworking. Between being in movies, having a talk show, and being a screenwriter/film producer, Ellen has a lot on her plate. She gives her all into each profession, and she is passionate about what she does.
  • She is kindhearted. On almost every single show, Ellen surprises her guest or a fan with something that helps them incredibly and changes their lives. Whether it’s donating money to a charity  or foundation (fun fact- she supports 49 different ones!) or giving back to a family in need, Ellen changes lives day by day. She makes an effort to significantly impact someone’s life, and she is so admirable.

Now What? Being a leader doesn’t mean having a title- it means that you express qualities that people admire. Leadership shows hard work, positivity, generosity, passion, and integrity. Ellen demonstrates all of these qualities and more, and that is why she is such an amazing role model. She inspires me to stop worrying about the little things, put my all into what I’m doing, and be the best leader I can be. It is well-known that people appreciate compassion and kindness, so I know to always demonstrate those qualities when working or talking to someone else.

 

Leadership Development, Leadership Education, Leadership Training

Igniting the Spark

As a requirement for our LAS Scholarship, our 2016 cohort needed to attend the Spark Leadership conference. Not knowing what exactly this conference would entail, I was pretty excited for it.

I walked into the ballroom in the LI, picked up my name tag, and sat at a table with a few people from my LAS cohort and a few others that I hadn’t met before. Also sitting at the table was a staff member of Spark, otherwise known as a team leader. After being called up and introduced to all of the people participating in Spark, the team leaders switched tables, and my table got the pleasure of working with Connor Haskins.

The first activity on the agenda was finding out our own personal leadership styles- something I was very interested in. The four different types of leaders were Systematic, Spirited, Considerate, and Direct. After ranking a series of activities from 1 to 5, I found out that I was a Spirited leader.

After learning about what type of leader we all were, we broke into different groups pertaining to our own leadership styles. I went into the Spirited group, and we all discussed why we were categorized into Spirited leaders and what characteristics we all exemplified. Some of these characteristics were that we were all super positive, very outgoing, we encouraged others, and we like to be outside of our comfort zones. After going back to our tables, we chose what leadership style we wanted to improve on. I chose Systematic, because I’d like to be more organized and want to step back and think about things more before going ahead and doing them.

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Photo by the Leadership Institute

Later, we were separated into different classrooms and were put into two groups: Alphas and Betas. I was an Alpha, and we were required to participate in a game. The rules of the Alpha culture were that we had to embrace in a hug or pat someone on the back before speaking to someone, we had to ask about the men in that person’s life, and we were then able to participate in a card game. The Betas would come over to our Alpha classroom to observe our behavior, and we would always kick them out.

After debriefing our activity, we learned that everyone gets treated differently and sometimes you have to take a step back and realize that we aren’t all the same. You could be saying or doing something offensive without even noticing, and we need to realize that everyone is different.

Now What? I got a lot out of Spark, and-despite having strep throat and wanting to be curled up in bed- I really enjoyed the conference. I learned that I am a Spirited leader, and I now know how to help out when it comes to leadership activities and now know what to contribute. I am excited to take the steps towards becoming a more Systematic leader by organizing all of my things into folders, color coding my notes that I take in class, thinking about and analyzing my actions before taking them, and participating in many more leadership conferences.

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Leadership Development, Uncategorized

Leadership Lecture: The Dirty Dozen

As shown in a previous post, I attended a conference at Great Wolf Lodge with my LAS Cohort and some amazing staff members. This conference was the 2016 Connections conference, and it exposed us to many ideas, taught us useful skills that we could bring back to CMU, and helped us make new friends.

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One of the sessions I attended at Connections was titled, “The Dirty Dozen.” This was an interactive lecture presented by the lovely Erin Smith-Gaken. In this session, Erin told us all about the twelve ways we justify our bad behavior. She gave us remotes to use during the session, and she put up a powerpoint and had us enter in our answers to the questions she was asking us. For example, Erin asked the question, “If you went into a grocery store and realized-as you were unloading the cart into your car-that you forgot to ring up a Vitamin Water, would you go back inside and tell someone?” We all entered our answers into the powerpoint, and she showed us the results. Most people said that they would not go back in and would just continue unloading the cart, while a small percentage of people said that they would go back in the grocery store and pay for the Vitamin Water.

Now What? This survey made me really stop and think about things. First off, not paying for the drink is stealing- but we would justify the fact that we “stole” the Vitamin Water by saying that we already left the store, and that it is too much of a hassle to go back inside. Second, I realized that our minds try to get us to rationalize anything that we do with logical reasons so we don’t feel bad about what we’ve done. Erin told us the top twelve ways that we rationalize our mistakes, and it was crazy that almost everyone could relate to most, if not all of them. It made me realize that sometimes I need to take a step back and understand that it is okay to make mistakes, because everyone is human. Heck, making mistakes makes us human, and we need to learn to accept them rather than try to justify them so we don’t look bad. I really connected with this session, and I even find myself (to this day) thinking about The Dirty Dozen.